Opened 7 years ago

Last modified 6 years ago

#7947 new Feature request

Add support for server type Unisys - OS2200

Reported by: David Traxler Owned by:
Priority: normal Component: FileZilla Client
Keywords: new server type OS2200 Cc:
Component version: Operating system type: Other
Operating system version: PC: Win 7

Description

I would like to have you add support for the Unisys OS2200 series mainframes. This OS does not use a hierarchical file structure. The only problem at the moment is that the Site Manager/Advanced tab/remote directory does not accept an OS 2200 file name.

The following is from the Unisys documentation on naming files and elements. Please contact me if you need more information.

3.3. Naming Files and Elements
The only part of a file name that is required is the basic file name, as follows:

filename.

All other fields are optional.
In some cases, the period is optional; if you do not include a period, the system assumes
that it is the name of a file. In other cases, if you do not include a period, the system
assumes that it is the name of an element. To avoid confusion, include the period except
for file names specified on the @BRKPT statement.
The name originally given to a file is called the external file name. A file can also have an
internal file name. See Section 7.68 for information on how to use the @USE statement
to give a file an internal name.
Using Files and Elements

File Name and Element Name Format

[directory-id#qualifier*]filename[(F-cycle)/read-key/write-key.element-name/
version(S-cycle)]

directory-id

Shared files exist exclusively on an OS 2200 mass storage device that is shared by
two or more OS 2200 systems. Shared files are different from local files, which are
files that are stored on a specific OS 2200 system.
The directory-id field is valid when file sharing is configured on the system. It indicates
which master file directory contains the file. The directory-ID has two possible values:
STD (standard) for local files on any system and SHARED for shared files.
The # is a delimiter to separate the directory-ID and qualifier.
This field is valid only for the following statements:

@ASG
@CAT
@FREE
@MODE
@QUAL
@USE

All other statements that have a filename field cannot include the directory-ID in the
file name. You can indirectly use a directory-ID for file names on these statements by
either giving them internal names with the @USE statement or by specifying
directory-IDs with the @QUAL statement, as in the following examples:

@USE P1,STD#QUAL1*FILEX
@COPY P1.,X.
@QUAL,D SHARED#QUAL1
@COPY FILE1.,FILE2.

In the second example, the default qualifier (QUAL1) and directory-ID (SHARED) that
were specified on the @QUAL,D statement are assumed in the file names on the
@COPY statement.

For more information on the @USE statement, see Section 7.68. For more information
on the @QUAL statement, see Section 7.49.
If you omit the directory-ID and # from a file name and do not specify a directory-ID on
a previous @QUAL statement, the system uses the director-ID value configured at
your site. One exception to this is if a user is cataloguing a shared removable pack file,
the system detects it is a shared pack and uses SHARED.
If you include the # but not a directory-ID, the system uses the implied directory-ID
you specified on a previous @QUAL statement. If you did not specify an implied
directory-ID, the system uses the directory-ID value configured at your site.
Using Files and Elements

The default directory-ID and default qualifier are the directory-ID and qualifier given on
the last @QUAL,D statement performed in a run. The implied directory-ID and implied
qualifier are the directory-ID and qualifier given on the last @QUAL with no options
performed in a run.

qualifier

The qualifier helps to ensure that file names are unique. Different files can have the
same file name, as long as their qualifiers or F-cycles are different. User-IDs and
project-IDs are commonly used as qualifiers, but you can create your own. The
qualifier can be up to 12 characters long and can include any combination of letters,
numbers, hyphens (-), and dollar signs ($). (The @QUAL statement, which also defines
the qualifier, is described in Section 7.48.)
If you omit the qualifier and asterisk (*) from a file name and do not specify a qualifier
on an @QUAL statement, the system uses the project-ID on your @RUN statement as
the qualifier.
If you include an asterisk (*) but not a qualifier, the system uses the implied qualifier
you specified on an @QUAL statement. If you did not specify an implied qualifier,
the system uses the project-id on your @RUN statement.

filename

The basic name of a file can be up to 12 characters long and can include any
combination of letters, numbers, hyphens (-), and dollar signs ($).
Note: Do not use a processor name (ELT or DATA, for example) as a file name.
The results will be unpredictable.

F-cycle

The F-cycle number identifies a file in a set of files that have the same qualifier and file
name. Normally, you never have to include an F-cycle number with a file name. If you
do not supply the F-cycle, you get the highest cataloged file cycle in the set. See
Section 3.4 for more information on F-cycles.

read-key/write-key

Keys are like passwords that are required to read a file or write to it. Keys typically
apply only to unowned files which are standard in Fundamental Security, but they
can be used for owned files if the system is so configured. Keys are an easy way
you can protect a file from unauthorized use. When you create a file, you can specify
a read key, write key, both, or neither. If you use only a write key, you must precede
it with two slashes to indicate that it is a write key, not a read key. Each key can be
up to six characters long. You can use any characters but the period (.), comma (,),
semicolon (;), slash (/), or blank.
To change the read or write key on a file, or to add a read or write key to an existing
file, use the @CHG statement as follows:
@CHG filename/RK/WK,filename/RK/WK

Using Files and Elements

where filename1 is the file to be changed (including the current read/write keys),
and filename2 is the file with its new or changed read or write keys. See Section 7.5
for more information on the @CHG statement.

element-name

Is the name of the element. Element names can be up to 12 characters long and can
include any combination of letters, numbers, hyphens (-), and dollar signs ($).
version
Is used to distinguish between elements that have the same name and type, but
contain different information. Using version names is one way you can save different
renditions of the same program. Version names can be up to 12 characters long and
can include any combination of letters, numbers, hyphens (-), and dollar signs ($).
If the element is an omnibus type, some processors can ignore the version.
A combination of element name and version need be unique only within a file.
Thus, .CH2/VER1 and .CH2/VER2 are two different elements (note the leading period).
Then with different files, FUR1*PUR.CH2/VER1, FUR1*PUR.CH2/VER2,
FUR2*PUR.CH2/VER1, and FUR2*PUR.CH2/VER2 are four different elements.

S-cycle

Is a number identifying a cycle of a symbolic element. Element cycles are different
stages a symbolic element goes through as it is updated by certain processors
(U-option). Normally, you do not need to be concerned about element cycling and
S-cycle numbers. Some processors, including IPF 1100, do not use element cycling.
Processors that accept symbolic element input always default to the most recent
cycle of a symbolic element. See Section 3.5 for more information.
Only the basic element name is required; the version and cycle numbers are optional.
In fact, you cannot use cycle numbers for elements other than symbolic elements.
Normally, different elements within the same file have different names. However,
elements can have the same name, provided their element types are different
(symbolic, relocatable, executable, or omnibus).

File Name Examples

ACCT-MASTER.
ACCT-MASTER is the basic file name. The system uses defaults for all other parts of
the file name:
· It uses the project-ID from the @RUN statement as the qualifier.
· It uses the current cycle of the file.
· No read key or write key is used.

GL*ACCT-MASTER.
GL is the qualifier, and ACCT-MASTER is the basic file name.
Using Files and Elements

GL*ACCT-MASTER/SESAME.
GL is the qualifier, ACCT-MASTER is the basic file name, and SESAME is the read
key.

PR*ACCT-MASTERPOPPY.
PR is the qualifier, ACCT-MASTER is the basic file name, and POPPY is the write key.
(The two slashes indicate that there is no read key and that POPPY is a write key, not
a read key.) The current cycle of the file is used.

GL*ACCT-BAL/SESAME/#%$&!.
GL is the qualifier, ACCT-BAL is the basic file name, SESAME is the read key, and
#%$&! is the write key.

SHARED#DATA*BASE.
SHARED is the directory-id, DATA is the qualifier, and BASE is the basic file name.

Element Name Examples

COLORS.RED,.BLUE,.YELLOW
All three elements (RED, BLUE, and YELLOW) are assumed to be in file COLORS.

COLORS.RED,.BLUE,YELLOW
The elements RED and BLUE are assumed to be in file COLORS, while element
YELLOW is assumed to be in the TPF$ file.

MAIN
In this example, only the basic element name is used. Since a cycle number is not
specified, the current cycle of the element is used. The version name is blank.

SUB1/APR02

Here, SUB1 is the basic element name, and APR02 identifies the version of the
element to be used. Since a cycle number is not specified, the current cycle of
element SUB1/APR02 is used.

When you specify an element name without a file name, the system usually assumes
that the element specified is in TPF$, a temporary file automatically assigned to your run.
An exception occurs when you specify a series of elements on the same control
statement. If you include a file name with the first element name and put a period before
the subsequent element names, the system assumes that those elements are in the
first file named.

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